Wednesday, 2 January 2019

In the Bedroom

Dear Blog Readers, 

Welcome to 2019. This is a year for the lesser explored aspects of Eating Disorders to be shared. This is the time to shatter the myths and stereotypes and give voice to topics and issues that are at the heart of the illness, are difficult to talk about, or that you’ve never even thought of. We will enter into taboo areas of our lives, while still staying within the safe space guidelines. I never thought this blog would be easy, or comfortable, or tidy. And yet I never could have imagined the courage and vulnerability of this community and the willingness to share the deepest parts of ourselves. 

This week Fred writes about the fear of body judgement in a sexual encounter. Upon reading that sentence I can picture the faces of readers cringing. This piece is not about sex. It is about how our own fear of judgement interferes with our ability to be truly open with others; our ability to give of ourselves freely. 

Take care of yourself and remember to nourish your body, mind, and spirit. 

Kira 
Your blog Moderator 

ps. I apologize to Fred for not posting this sooner. I humbly admit that I thought I had already posted it, and that instead it fell through the cracks. I’m sorry. 

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In the Bedroom


From an eating disorder perspective, I suffer from an eating disorder. Body image is a big one for me. In the bedroom, I struggle — against myself, another man. I am vulnerable in the bedroom. I can’t fully take off my clothes. I can’t be completely naked.

I hate my body.


I don’t like the way my body looks. I go around this issue by never removing my top. In the bedroom, with sex in mind, I feel helpless if I take off my top. I’m scared of what the other guy will think of me. Without my clothes, I look like an ogre.


Removing my pants or shorts and then quickly adjusting my underwear is what I do to stay safe. In the bedroom, thinking of sex, I have rules. These are clothes rules.


The textile relationship described here is tied to my eating disorder. There is something about eating disorders that ties them to body image. Not all eating disorders are the same. For me, body image in the bedroom, thinking through and having sex, is scary. My eating disorder and all of its symptoms and body image revolve around men and how they see me. I am tender around men.


Letting go of my tops, or my socks, underwear, and so on, is something I do at the beach. At and around the beach, I accept that I am hairy and different.

My goal this summer is to imagine the beach and surroundings in my bedroom. I’m tired of hiding. I want to let go of my fear of being naked, just like I remove most of my clothes at the beach.



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Work published on this blog is property of the writer/artist. Content on this blog is edited and approved by the moderator. Sheena’s Place does not specifically endorse any advice or content. This blog is not a substitute for medical advice. Please see your family doctor if you have concerns about yourself or your recovery. No one can recover alone.

If you would like to share your story, or other writings or art, please email your submission to Kmccarthy@sheenasplace.org

If you or someone in your life is struggling with an Eating Disorder, you can contact the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) at http://nedic.ca/ 

If you would like more information or to register for groups, visit Sheena's Place website at www.sheenasplace.org

If you are in a country other than Canada, please google your local or National Eating Disorders Centre.

Thursday, 20 December 2018

Holiday Survival Tips

Dear Blog Readers, 


Holidays. Pretty lights all around. Familiar sights and smells. Family. 


Whether you celebrate Christmas or not, its there. In your face. All the time. Every store. Every advertisement. You can’t escape it. For some it is a beautiful time of year. For others it is the epitome of hell. 


Whatever you celebrate throughout the year, I’m sure you can relate to family gatherings, work parties, and getting together with friends. 


It is joyous and exhausting. It is full of expectations and obligations. Warmth and love. Stress and anxiety. All wrapped up with a big bow made of good and bad memories. 


I reached out to the community and asked for some strategies to stay safe, well, and on track this season. To share your own strategies, ideas, or stories about the holidays, please comment below or email me at sheenassharedstories@gmail.com


Here are some ideas from our community:


“I made myself a small soothing package that I keep in my purse. It has a fidget toy, a special tiny stone I can hold without being noticed, and a fragrance I can sniff when I excuse myself to go to the bathroom.” 


“I carry a self-care kit with me wherever I go. Then all my things that calm me are in one place.”


“I wear a bracelet my Gramma gave me when I was 16. When I put it on I feel safe.”


“There’s a couple of good friends who understand me. We text each other when we need support.”


“I’m a terrible liar. Like really bad. So I drink as many beverages as I possibly can. Especially with caffeine. Then I can honestly excuse myself to go to the bathroom multiple times without having to lie!”


“Using my dog as an excuse to leave early is awesome. He needs to be walked so I have a limited amount of time to give.”


“Boundaries boundaries boundaries. Set them. Keep them. Allow them to make you safe.”


“If you need to leave then leave. Who’s going to stop you? Go outside for a few minutes. Go for a walk. Offer to go on a coffee run. Your well-being matters more than anything else.”


“Bring a buffer. Bring a person who can run interference. If you have a family member you trust, tell them your triggers and ask them to prepare to change the subject if needed.”


“Offer to take the small children into another room to take care of them. Then you’re awesome and no one knows it’s your way of bailing.”


“Don’t go? Just joking. I go prepared with broken record phrases like:

  • I’m not comfortable talking about that 
  • Enough about me, how are things with YOU?
  • Hold that thought, I’ll be right back”


“Stick to your routine. Plan ahead. But also be flexible. Participating in something you enjoy for one day, or even at each gathering, doesn’t mean you aren’t in recovery. The work is not letting guilt and shame crush you for doing what everyone else is doing. Its okay to celebrate sometimes you know.”


“If you’ve participated in more than you had planned or in more than feels comfortable, do not change your routine to overcompensate. Our brains lie to us. The rest of the world goes oh no I can’t believe I did that and minutes later move on. Tell your brain to shut up and get right back to your routine.”


“Food has no moral value.”


I think it is important to remember that the holidays are meant to be joyful. They are meant to make you feel loved, welcomed, and that you belong. Your ED will tell you that you are unworthy and unloveable. It is lying. Its a liar. Tell that thought “I  hear you but I know I’m enough”.  Surround yourself with people and experiences that bring you joy. If family obligations do not offer you that, make a point of finding that in the next few days. 


Above all else, remind yourself that:

  • you are not your eating disorder 
  • Recovery is not linear 
  • Every moment is an opportunity to stop and reset
  • You are worth recovery so reset and keep going


We would love to hear your strategies! Please comment below or email me at 

sheenassharedstories@gmail.com


Take care of yourself, and remember to nourish your mind, body, and spirit. 


Your blog moderator, 

Kira 


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Work published on this blog is property of the writer/artist. Content on this blog is edited and approved by the moderator. Sheena’s Place does not specifically endorse any advice or content. This blog is not a substitute for medical advice. Please see your family doctor if you have concerns about yourself or your recovery. No one can recover alone.


If you would like to share your story, or other writings or art, please email your submission to Kmccarthy@sheenasplace.org


If you or someone in your life is struggling with an Eating Disorder, you can contact the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) at http://nedic.ca/ 


If you would like more information or to register for groups, visit Sheena's Place website at www.sheenasplace.org


If you are in a country other than Canada, please google your local or National Eating Disorders Centre.




Wednesday, 19 December 2018

WALKING THE FOOTSTEPS TOWARDS RECOVERY:

Monday, December 3, 2018

 

WALKING THE FOOTSTEPS TOWARDS RECOVERY:

 

I am sitting here in front of a blank Word Document, ready to start writing.  I am not quite sure how to get started.  I am approaching a journey in my life that could be extremely treacherous. Although I am not quite sure how to use words to describe what I wish, I am mapping out my own individual healing journey. I am approaching myself as a person whose been wounded by her eating disorder.  It is difficult to understand my thoughts and emotions as they arise.  Even my sensations, as I feel them inside my bodyleave me not knowing anymore what to feel.  Is it more important to detach myself from my own self as a writer?  I wish to reach out to others. I have similar concerns than others about food, body image issues and psychological problems related to eating disorders.  Who am I writing for?  Is writing for an audience an area that I need to be sensitive about?  Sometimes, being spontaneous with regard to my writing is the most effective way to start.

It is tough to begin a piece like this in the present moment.  It makes writing interesting. When understanding sensations in my body set the pace for wishing for a smoother recovery.  What is it that I wish to write about for Sheena's Place?  My intentions differ so much from what I feel ready to discuss at this given moment.  Today may not be an appropriate time to discuss what I have hoped to.  I am simply getting my feet wet.  Sometimes it takes getting started by writing in simple language what I would like to introduce to my readers to. As part of my journey towards recovery, I wish to write what can be an asset to others.  We are all coming from separate places and points of view.  Is there enough space in this written piece to delve into my experiences? It may be helpful for others to learn what is happens while trying to be creative.  Maybe as a writer I am finding a need to unwind with my work, and go with the flow.  Finding a focal point to start writing about recovery, related issues and self-compassion may need sometimes my gradually getting acquainted with a topic that is meaningful.  It becomes like a winding road.  Which is the way to go? I truthfully wish to embrace my own sense of self-compassion.  Depending on the day, it is not always accessible to endure loving feelings towards myself.  At times, our senses of self-compassion become muddled up by our negative emotions.  Sometimes they interfere with our abilities to feel safe and trusting within ourselves.

I have suffered from many years from a mental illness.  It has been difficult to feel better a lot of the time.  My illness is complicated.  It has left me missing so many experiences.  I am having consequences from many missed opportunities.  My eating disorder is what has triggered for me a chain reaction of many symptoms.  Without getting lost in trying to explain as a fourteen year old, my truth was only beginning to be revealed. It seemed that my symptoms developed into greater disturbances.  It was extremely difficult to diagnose me. Understanding the environmental factors that interfered made my situation sometimes overbearingly complex.  It is a long story.  Telling it in detail would take more than a book length autobiography.  The most I can share at this point, is that my eating disorder kept flaring up for many years.  It wasn't the point that at fifty I swallowed my pride. I gave it up.  It was my anorexia that I gave up on.  I was almost in an all or nothing trap.  It wasn't helping me.  I didn't have the skills to utilize. I wasn't learning how to interrupt symptoms.  Sometimes it was a nightmare for me. Developing Type Two Diabetes and feeling blamed for this was too much.  I self-blamed.  My body image almost prevented me from walking down the street. A lot of what I went through led me to social anxiety disorder and agoraphobia.  It may have been necessary from my psychiatrist's point of view to ignore my Eating Disorder symptoms. I gradually stopped my struggle to be a certain way.  I did partially over time, make improvements.   It wasn't right for me to keep being on medications that caused side effects.  They triggered the diabetes that was a handful to accept and deal with.

Here I am as a writer, wishing to tell my story.  I am feeling wounded beyond what I am able to handle at this point.  My psychiatrist achieved in his own ways results that were appropriate.  I am diabetic.  I had some near life and death situations with my sugar level.   My family doctor does not put pressure on me.  It is tough illness to manage.  For now I have reached a bit of a happy medium.  My body image is improving.  

  I had previously seen a professional in the field of eating disorders for five years.  I think of ways I could still change further.  I am an x-dieter.  It would be appropriate for me in kinder ways to learn to be friend with myself.  No rush for January 2019. I am trying to understand self-compassion and what it means to be connected to Sheena's Place again.  I am feeling excited about my writing for this Blog. 

Now that I've already began getting my feet wet, I think there are many ways I can help myself be the compassionate person I am in many ways.  I have read many books on Compassion-Focused Therapy.  As I write this piece I am visualizing many avenues to heal myself from my longstanding eating disorder and other areas of my life.  I do feel empowered by sharing this story.  Recovery and eventual classes that I hope to endeavour in at Sheena's may gradually feel like I am becoming at ease with myself. Sometimes it becomes too much.  Life isoverwhelming. Medication reactions are tough.  Maybe working with someone who could help me at this stagewould offer me some guidance. For now writing through some of my pain may help myself.

Writing this piece feels like some doors are opening up to me.  I would strongly like to go deeper into areas that bring me hope and meaning.  This is a beginning writing attempt.  When someone is suffering from an eating disorder, it is hard to differentiate from the reality that of what it is.  It is not always the best option to be non-accepting of an eating disorder needing to be ignored.  When my psychiatrist was only checking my blood work and he wasn't specialized in treating me for anorexia, I was devastated and depressed.  I was a patient crying for help. I needed help. It is too much looking back. Realizing the wounds that I kept tolerating were growing as suffering I could not explain.  At times I did take drastic measures as means of seeking attention. I wasn't helped or heard during this time. I was misunderstood and hurting.  I wanted to be cared about and loved. I am getting grounded.  There is a continuation to this piece.  My overall recovery is feeling hopeful.  I am optimistic that whoever readers I connect with understand that there is a kernel of truth in wanting to be understood and needing to be heard.  Whatever is soothing and comforting in helping ourselves accept ourselves and what sometimes is unacceptable, there's a way to get started.   Here is my first step.      


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Work published on this blog is property of the writer/artist. Content on this blog is edited and approved by the moderator. Sheena’s Place does not specifically endorse any advice or content. This blog is not a substitute for medical advice. Please see your family doctor if you have concerns about yourself or your recovery. No one can recover alone.

If you would like to share your story, or other writings or art, please email your submission to Kmccarthy@sheenasplace.org

If you or someone in your life is struggling with an Eating Disorder, you can contact the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) at http://nedic.ca/ 

If you would like more information or to register for groups, visit Sheena's Place website at www.sheenasplace.org

If you are in a country other than Canada, please google your local or National Eating Disorders Centre.


Sunday, 9 December 2018

The Power of Words by Preetha


Dear Blog Readers, 

This week, Preetha writes about how powerful language can be. One of the fantastic facilitators at Sheena’s Place, whom we shall call “Leah”, often speaks of the small changes to our vocabulary that creates changes in the ways we think and feel about ourselves and the world. “Leah” speaks of the invalidating word “but” as a way for judgement and shame to take their place in your truth. For example, one could say “I have not been symptomatic for 2 weeks”, or that same person could say “I have not been symptomatic for 2 weeks, but I know that it won’t last.” Any sentence that comes after the word “but” entirely erases the first part of the sentence. 

“I graduated from high school, but it was easy.”

“I was published in the New York Times, but the article isn’t that great.”

“I just got hired at this awesome company, but that’s because I totally faked my way through the interview.”

In DBT (Dialectical Behavioural Therapy) the word “but” is replaced with the word “and” to express that too oppositional thoughts can exist at the same time. This concept has also been used in conflict resolution training for decades. For example when addressing a colleague about an issue one might say “I understand that you disagree with me, and at the same time I think I have made some valid points”. 

Words to explore:
but
should
must
normal
crazy

I would love to hear from you about other words that can change our thinking, and examples of how the power of words have affected your life. Please email me at Kmccarthy@sheenasplace.org or comment here by clicking the “comment” box below. 

You don’t have to write a whole story or an article, you can write a few sentences to inspire or remind us about how much influence language has over our thoughts, emotions, interactions, and experiences. 

Take care of yourself, and remember to nourish your mind, body, and spirit. 

Your blog moderator, 
Kira 

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Date: June 2017
Project 4: How to say it 
Title: The power of words
General purpose: To inform and persuade
specific purpose: After hearing my speech the audience should understand the power of words

  Words are so powerful they can cause death or save life.  I took a writing course with Beth Kaplan, an author and creative writing instructor at Ryerson University.  She explained the power of words using an illustration with the diary of Anne Frank.  Little did Anne Frank know, when the Jewish people were being persecuted, that the words this child scribbled in a diary would one day have so much worth.  Words are power, they are so potent that they can build and destroy.  In the next few minutes I will illustrate and argue the power of If you want to kill without a weapon, use words. An example of this is bullying.  So many young lives are taken from this world because of bullying and words.  Words are capable of wounding someone so deeply that it can cause death. 

I would like to now talk about how words can save. I will use the example of the many distress centre that exist today to illustrate my point.  The Gerstein centre, Medic and so on and so forth are centres where people who are in distress can call for support.  The support is all oral.  Words save lives. People that are in distress are saved by words. So, words are so powerful that they can save.  

Love and hate are expressed through words. We all know the melody of words of romantic love.  Romantic love is expressed in words.  In fact, all forms of love are expressed in words and gestures. All the love songs that exist in any language are such a poetic and beautiful combination of words. Hate and heated arguments are also expressed in words.  When we get into a heated argument we often express our anger verbally and we end up regretting it and apologizing.

Knowledge is acquired and shared through words.    And I think knowledge is power hence language and words are power.  Humans think in words.  Words are everything happening in the world.  All the written holy scriptures started with words.  History and religion is preserved and remembered using the power of a pen and paper.   I live on words. Words sustain me and keep me alive.  I consider the written word to be my companion.  I read an average of one wisdom books per month and I usually take two classes per semester.  I love language, words and knowledge. I am passionate about these things. 

In conclusion words are potent.  Words can really hurt a person.  Words can kill and sustain.   Words can damage a person so deeply that they can create a wound so deep that the only solution one sees to the suffering is to take their own life. Words also have the power to heal.  A person in distress is often helped verbally. Love and hate is expressed verbally.  So, I invite you to control your tonged, watch the words you utter and think before you speak.  Once a word is uttered it cannot be taken back. I 'm going to leave you with a quote from Nathaniel Hawthorn who was born in 1804 and was an American novelist, Dark Romantic, and short story writer.  

 “Words - so innocent and powerless as they are, as standing in a dictionary, how potent for good and evil they become in the hands of one who knows how to combine them.”

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Work published on this blog is property of the writer/artist. Content on this blog is edited and approved by the moderator. Sheena’s Place does not specifically endorse any advice or content. This blog is not a substitute for medical advice. Please see your family doctor if you have concerns about yourself or your recovery. No one can recover alone.

If you would like to share your story, or other writings or art, please email your submission to Kmccarthy@sheenasplace.org

If you or someone in your life is struggling with an Eating Disorder, you can contact the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) at http://nedic.ca/ 

If you would like more information or to register for groups, visit Sheena's Place website at www.sheenasplace.org

If you are in a country other than Canada, please google your local or National Eating Disorders Centre.


Sunday, 25 November 2018

ED, Bigger Bodies, and Health Care


Dear Blog Readers,

This week is part 2 of our look at living with Eating Disorders in bigger bodies.

If discussion of experiences with the medical profession are difficult for you to read, this may not be the post for you. I have chosen to weave together these stories to give voice to what is mostly silent. The shame of being shamed by a doctor is intense. People of all bodies experience doctors shaming them. What is different for people in bigger bodies is that this is reflected in our every day experience, in media, in television and movies, in the design of public space, and many other aspects of society than you could possibly imagine.

I encourage you, if you feel able, to read and feel the discomfort that so many of us feel every day. If you aren't up to it, your feelings are valid. Take good care of yourself and come back next week to check out the next post.

"[...] the core idea is that our societal terror of big bodies means those who have them often don't get adequate medical care" - Denise Balkassoon, Globe and Mail, August 7, 2018

The shaming and ostracizing of bigger bodies has become a pathology and the source of illness instead of simply being one of the determinants of health. The medical profession and the pathologizing of obesity plays a major role in the health care of people in bigger bodies. From the stories I have gathered, women in bigger bodies often face immediate dismissal from doctors. In the past I have hated conversations about negative medical experiences. It causes feelings of hopelessness. And here I am discussing the hard and messy truth of Eating Disorders. These voices have the right to be heard.

As discussed in Part 1, being in a bigger body means living in a world that was not designed with you in mind. It means living in a body that doesn't fit in ... literally. In order to talk about the healthcare profession, I first need to remind you of last week's exploration of how the physical world has multiple barriers that leave people of size feeling like they cannot participate in important aspects of social interactions. Thus further ingraining the idea that we do not belong.

"As a body positive woman of size, I have found it increasingly difficult when it comes to the world not being designed for bigger bodies. Last year I went to see my favourite comedian at the Sony Centre in Toronto. I could barely fit into the seat. My hips and thighs were being bruised and my legs went numb. My arms were in my neighbour's space so I had to put my arm over the back of my friend's chair the whole time so that I could scooch away from my neighbour as much as possible. I tried to enjoy my time, but I was in agony. This has occurred at Massey Hall as well. It happens in places with flimsy plastic chairs, arms or not, I have to hover on the chair for fear I'll break it. If I sit at a booth, I am being wedged in and my tummy gets a big dent across it that hurts. Also - any lawn furniture EVER." - H

It is exhausting to constantly have to stake out the place you have been invited to make sure there is furniture you can sit on. It evokes a great deal of shame to show up to an activity with your friends and it never occurred to them that this body will struggle through it, if this body can do it at all. Or how mortifying it is to show up to go snow shoeing with friends only to learn that there is a weight limit and you have surpassed it.

"Next week I am going on a plane and I'm nervous about the seats. I'm cool with asking for a seatbelt extender, loud and proud. I'm just worried about the arms digging in. On the TTC, my fave is when someone is on the aisle seat and there is a free window seat. I ask politely to sit, and they don't stand up, they make me squeeze past them. I love rubbing my big body across them harshly when they do this. Like, do you not see my size? When I get two seats to myself I have noticed that folks are hesitant to sit beside me, thinking there isn't enough room." - H

On top of the messages physical spaces give us, and society says to us, there are the doctors and other health professionals that shame us and prevent us from seeking care.

When you add the complex issues of having an Eating Disorder and the compounded feelings of shame surrounding body image, you have the perfect storm for being too anxious to advocate to doctors.

We give great power to people with medical degrees. We hand over our autonomy to the experts, as though we know nothing about our own bodies and rely on them to tell us what is going on inside of us. Ultimately, these experts turn to weight.

Blaming ailments on weight is a short-cut. Its a cop out. And it kills.

It is time for speak up about all the times we have been to a doctor who ran no tests, provided no answers, and blamed the ailment on weight.

"There is evidence to suggest that people avoid the healthcare system for all kinds of reasons, one of them being the stigma an shame they encounter, and in some cases that could be really harmful to their health." - Michael Orsini, Professor UofT, July 2018

I have spent several months collecting stories about what it is like to visit a doctor while having an Eating Disorder and living in a bigger body. In my own life, I have had a neurologist blame my weight for my memory-loss, moments of confusion, and a tremor in my left hand. Her report to my family doctor included recommendations for drastic surgical procedures. Stories like this lead to poorer health and even death. In terms of this blog, some of the stories were so horrible, and so disgusting that I can't share them. To the people who shared those stories, I am sorry that you have had to live through this shaming and the pain of your untreated, undiagnosed ailments. You are heard.

"Ellen Maud Bennett died on May 11 after being diagnosed with inoperable cancer and being given only days to live [...] Ellen's dying wish was that women of size make her death matter by advocating strongly for their health and not accepting that fat is the only relevant health issue." - Globe and Mail, July 30, 2018

It is painful and infuriating to watch a friend refuse to see a doctor about an injury for fear of weight-assumption-judgement. The belief that seeking medical attention for an injury is a waste of time, is evidence of our on-going fear that we will not be heard and we will not be believed.

"I knew there was something wrong with my knee, but I also knew the doctor would say that it would feel better if I lost weight and not even bother to take an x-ray." - S

"When I had extreme pain around my rib cage that felt like I was being crushed and couldn't breathe, I was rushed by ambulance to the nearest hospital where the triage nurse asked me 2 questions and sent me to the waiting room saying based on my weight it was a 'gallbladder attack'. Despite a very unclear ultrasound result, I was admitted for 4 days and put on morphine which actually made it worse. After the surgeon made numerous comments about gallstones in fat people, he cut me open and removed a piece of my body, he said "when we got the gallbladder out, it wasn't actually inflamed at all and there were no stones. It was fine. good luck." ............ 11 years later and I continue to have these attacks and am told they are "phantom gallbladder attacks" ... but no longer have one. After many years, it was my therapist who guided me to realize that it is panic attacks." - D

When you have an Eating Disorder, going for a medical appointment can be excruciating. When every medical professional you encounter exudes what you interpret as judgment, or actually make judgmental comments. These stories and the stories of others make me sad and angry. I feel like we should all be angry. None of this is acceptable. Being in a bigger body makes it easy to be dehumanized. Bigger bodies leads to assumptions about behaviours and stereotypes about being lazy or undisciplined. Medical professionals are not immune to the beliefs of society.

"My doctor doesn't believe me that I have an Eating Disorder. She never has. She makes jokes about my body and comments on what I should and should eat. She makes me feel worse and worse every time I see her." - P

"I was symptomatic [engaging in Eating Disorder symptoms/behaviours] in the psych ward because of stress. The doctor suggested that being symptomatic wasn't a problem because it looked like I could lose a little weight." - A

If we are to create change, it needs to begin with the people we place our trust in; we need to be able to trust that the experts in our physical health can put aside their bias and find the core of the medical issue instead of dismissing bigger bodies and using weight as the only determinant of health.

I want to end this piece on a more positive note. If you need support in finding a health care provider familiar with the specific and unique needs of people with ED, you can visit the Sheena's Place website, contact Sheena's Place, or contact NEDIC (see contact information below).

There are people out there who understand that a bigger body does not define who you are. People are far less aware of our bodies than we imagine.

Take care of yourself and be sure to nourish your body, mind, and spirit.

Your blog moderator,

Kira


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Work published on this blog is property of the writer/artist. Content on this blog is edited and approved by the moderator. Sheena’s Place does not specifically endorse any advice or content. This blog is not a substitute for medical advice. Please see your family doctor if you have concerns about yourself or your recovery. No one can recover alone.

If you would like to share your story, or other writings or art, please email your submission to Kmccarthy@sheenasplace.org

If you or someone in your life is struggling with an Eating Disorder, you can contact the National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) at 
http://nedic.ca/ 

If you would like more information or to register for groups, visit Sheena's Place website at 
www.sheenasplace.org

If you are in a country other than Canada, please google your local or National Eating Disorders Centre.

In the Bedroom